Mystery of Earth-sized 'hidden planet' discovered on outer edges of the Solar System leaves scientists baffled

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A MYSTERIOUS Earth-sized "hidden planet" was possibly discovered on the outer edges of the Solar System – leaving scientists longing for the truth.

The unidentified sphere is suspected to be "Planet Nine," a hypothetical planet on the edge of our Solar System. 


There are only eight known planets in the solar system – Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

A recent study has revealed to have found data "worth checking" as there could be proof of the mysterious planet existing.

Back in 1983, Astronomer Michael Rowan-Robinson analyzed data obtained by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and found three potential sources for the planet between June and September of that year.

The study found the object to travel across the sky "in a region of space close to the galactic plane," according to Sputnik News.

The astronomer admits it's unlikely a true finding, but it could help other studies or scientists know where to look for future searches.

"Given the poor quality of the IRAS detections, at the very limit of the survey, and in a very difficult part of the sky for far infrared detections, the probability of the candidate being real is not overwhelming," Rowan-Robinson wrote in his findings, according to Science Alert."

"However, given the great interest of the Planet 9 hypothesis, it would be worthwhile to check whether an object with the proposed parameters and in the region of sky proposed, is inconsistent with the planetary ephemerides."

Back in January 2015, a group of astronomers insisted they found the "hidden planet" X orbiting the Sun with the help of mathematical calculations.

However, not all astronomers believed the claims to be true.

But now, a new study is claiming to have put together data on the mystery object which is "worth checking."

The new study called "A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data" was published this month by Rowan-Robinson.

Rowan-Robinson explains: "I have carried out a search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data. At the distance range proposed for Planet 9, the signature would be a 60-micron unidentified IRAS point source with an associated nearby source from the IRAS Reject File of sources which received only a single hours-confirmed (HCON) detection.

"The confirmed source should be detected on the first two HCON passes, but not on the third, while the single HCON should be detected only on the third HCON. I have examined the unidentified sources in three IRAS 60micron catalogues: some can be identified with 2MASS galaxies, Galactic sources or as cirrus.

He concluded: "Dynamical simulations are needed to explore whether the candidate is consistent with existing planet ephemerides.

"If so, a search in an annulus of radius 2.5-4 deg centred on the 1983 position at visible and near-infrared wavelengths would be worthwhile."

Sputnik News explains the astronomer "conceded that what could be Planet Nine could also be just noise from these clouds.

There are only eight known planets in the solar system – Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

A recent study has revealed to have found data "worth checking" as there could be proof of the mysterious planet existing.

Back in 1983, Astronomer Michael Rowan-Robinson analyzed data obtained by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and found three potential sources for the planet between June and September of that year.

The study found the object to travel across the sky "in a region of space close to the galactic plane," according to Sputnik News.

The astronomer admits it's unlikely a true finding, but it could help other studies or scientists know where to look for future searches.

"Given the poor quality of the IRAS detections, at the very limit of the survey, and in a very difficult part of the sky for far-infrared detections, the probability of the candidate being real is not overwhelming," Rowan-Robinson wrote in his findings, according to Science Alert."

"However, given the great interest of the Planet 9 hypothesis, it would be worthwhile to check whether an object with the proposed parameters and in the region of sky proposed, is inconsistent with the planetary ephemerides."

Back in January 2015, a group of astronomers insisted they found the "hidden planet" X orbiting the Sun with the help of mathematical calculations.

However, not all astronomers believed the claims to be true.

But now, a new study is claiming to have put together data on the mystery object which is "worth checking."

The new study called "A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data" was published this month by Rowan-Robinson.

Rowan-Robinson explains: "I have carried out a search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data. At the distance range proposed for Planet 9, the signature would be a 60 micron unidentified IRAS point source with an associated nearby source from the IRAS Reject File of sources which received only a single hours-confirmed (HCON) detection.

"The confirmed source should be detected on the first two HCON passes, but not on the third, while the single HCON should be detected only on the third HCON. I have examined the unidentified sources in three IRAS 60micron catalogues: some can be identified with 2MASS galaxies, Galactic sources or as cirrus.

He concluded: "Dynamical simulations are needed to explore whether the candidate is consistent with existing planet ephemerides.

"If so, a search in an annulus of radius 2.5-4 deg centred on the 1983 position at visible and near infrared wavelengths would be worthwhile."

Sputnik News explains the astronomer "conceded that what could be Planet Nine could also be just noise from these clouds.

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