Huge solar eruption creates 'canyon of fire' on the Sun with threat of strong flares headed towards Earth | The Sun

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A HUGE solar eruption on the sun has caused a "canyon of fire" to tear across its surface, with fears it could send a storm of flares heading towards Earth.

A dark filament of magnetism whipped out of the sun's atmosphere on Friday, Space Weather reported.

This eruption created a gigantic tear to appear on the sun's surface.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded the solar eruption.

The canyon which appeared in the sun was 155,000 miles long, and 15,500 miles deep, according to Space Weather.

An arc of plasma filament of can be seen suspended above the surface of the canyon, before it is flung out into space.

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The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) observed a type of solar storm called a Coronal Mass Ejection, or CME, emerging from the sun's northern hemisphere after the solar eruption.

The difference between CMEs and solar flares is that CMEs travel slower than solar flares that could reach Earth in about eight minutes.

The fastest CME would take 15 to 18 hours to hit Earth.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are currently modeling the CME to determine if it will hit Earth.

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Although the CME seems less threatening, there is a chance of solar flares from an occurrence that has happened today.

There are approximately six large sunspots on the sun.

"At least two of them pose a threat for strong flares," according to Space Weather.

NASA explains this phenomenon: "The magnetic field lines near sunspots often tangle, cross, and reorganize. This can cause a sudden explosion of energy called a solar flare."

NOAA forecasters estimate a 45 percent chance of M-class, medium-sized, flares and a 10 percent chance of X-class, large-sized, flares.

If these flares are created, they are expected to erupt on Sunday.

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X-class flares are more frightening because they can cause radio blackouts across Earth and long-lasting radiation storms.

M-class flares only cause short blackouts in the Earth's North and South poles.

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